Middlesex Fells in Early October

Middlesex Fells in Early October

Photos taken in the western part of the Middlesex Fells Reservation near Winchester, MA on October 5, 2008.

Copyright (c) 2008, Sandra J. Loosemore. Photos are provided for personal viewing only; no other use is permitted without prior written consent.


I started my hike at the north trailhead, just off I-93. There were a lot of these asters growing around the parking area here. I think they're probably the kind called "frost asters". Most of these species of fall white asters have yellow centers that turn red or purple after they've been pollinated.
Here's the trail, proper, entering the woods as it leaves the parking lot.
First stop on the hike was the Bear Hill observation tower.
Here's a view from the top of the tower, looking southwestwards in the general area I'm headed for the rest of the hike. You can see that the trees have barely started to turn yet.
Coming down from Bear Hill, I met up with the Skyline Trail, which I followed around the north part of the reservation. Here it's passing through a stand of towering pines.
Here's a cascade of mushrooms growing out of the end of a fallen tree.
I made a short detour to look at North Reservoir, which is owned by the city of Winchester.
Here's the base of the earth dam that forms the reservoir.
Back on the Skyline Trail on the other side of the reservoir, and over some rocks.
Some goldenrods growing here in the sun.
Back into the shady woods for a while, on a flatter trail.
Here's a bee on some wood asters.
This thistle-type flower is a knapweed, an introduced weed.
More asters, with a hoverfly. I think these are a different species than the ones around the parking lot -- smaller flowers, and green stems rather than purple. Perhaps heath asters?
One of several small woodland ponds I passed by. It didn't seem to be the right time of year for frogs.
Back on the Skyline Trail, and more rocks.
Still more rocks.
Another goldenrod growing in the rocks. It kind of beats me what species these are..... where I grew up in Michigan, the common goldenrods had more feathery/frond-like flower bracts, rather than spikes like this.
A bee visits the goldenrod.
I ended my hike at Bellevue Pond, at the south end of the reservation.


Back to the main photography page.