Arnold Arboretum in October

Arnold Arboretum in October

Photos taken at Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain, MA on October 12, 2008.

Copyright (c) 2008, Sandra J. Loosemore. Photos are provided for personal viewing only; no other use is permitted without prior written consent.


I followed the trail from the T station through the "unimproved" Bussey Brook section of the Arboretum. No Olmsted landscaping here, just a cleaned-up and reclaimed vacant plot of land.
Spotted knapweed growing by the trail.
Fall asters, and a stray chicory.
There were lots and lots of asters here.
I feel like I ought to recognize this shrub with the clusters of seeds.....
These burrs are the original velcro.
These yellow flowers look like something in the evening primrose family (4 petals). They were growing on a spike about 3 feet tall.
Here's another spike of the yellow flowers.
And a close-up.
Entering the Arboretum proper, I headed to the south section where I saw these flashy berries growing on a shrub near the gate. Stupid me, I forgot to snap a photo of the name tag on the shrub, and now I only remember that the shrub is native to Korea.
Here's a close-up. The red pods open up to expose a blue berry.
Heading clockwise around the trail loop, you pass through a crabapple orchard, with lots of different varieties.
Off in the corner, there's a pear tree.
I didn't see a partridge in the pear tree, but it did have a lot of pears. They were small and hard, not good eating.
Continuing to loop around, here are more trees loaded with crabapples.
Next comes a stand of huge oak trees.
More oaks, and a bright-colored maple.
Why did the caterpillar cross the road?
Here's a bee on a hawkweed flower.
View of the Boston skyline from the top of Peters Hill. Although it's mid-October, fall leaf season is only getting started.
Heading back to the central section of the Arboretum on the conifer path.
The conifer path comes out near the walnut trees. Here's one of the nuts.
And the walnut trees.
Here's a splash of bright color -- it's a butternut hickory tree.
And here's a maple that's turned early.
One of the small ponds near the Arborway gate.
More crabapples here.
Nowadays most people grow crabapples purely as ornamental trees, but they're quite edible as well. I was sampling a few as I was going around -- the smaller ones, like these, were quite ripe and sweet, with a strong cidery taste. You probably wouldn't want to snack on them, but they're traditionally good for making jelly, and would probably make a good applesauce as well if you ran them through a food mill to strain out the seeds.


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